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Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law

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About

The Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law is a non-profit, public interest legal foundation dedicated to furthering and protecting the civil, constitutional, and human rights of immigrants, refugees, children, prisoners, and the poor.

Since its incorporation in 1980, under the leadership of a board of directors, the Center has provided a wide range of legal services to vulnerable low-income victims of human and civil rights violations and technical support and training to hundreds of legal aid attorneys and paralegals in the areas of immigration law, constitutional law, and complex and class action litigation.

The Center has achieved major victories in numerous major cases in the courts of the United States and before international bodies that have directly benefited hundreds of thousands of disadvantaged persons.

Areas of Expertise

The Center is a legal services support center with recognized expertise in complex litigation, constitutional law, and laws targeting vulnerable populations including immigrants, refugees, at-risk children, survivors of domestic violence, prisoners in solitary confinement, and member of LGBT communities.

The Center is a legal services support center with recognized expertise in complex litigation, constitutional law, and laws targeting vulnerable insular populations including immigrants, refugees, at-risk children, survivors of domestic violence, prisoners in solitary confinement, and member of LGBT communities. A partial list of the Center's major litigation includes the following cases: Plyler v. Doe, 457 U.S. 202 (1982) (lead counsel for state-wide class of undocumented children denied access to public elementary education because of their immigration status); Reno v. Catholic Social Services, 509 U.S. 43 (1993) (national class action on behalf of persons unlawfully denied legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986); Reno v. Flores, 507 U.S. 292 (1993) (national class action on behalf of children denied release on bail pending the outcome of deportation proceedings); League of United Latin American Citizens v. Wilson, 131 F. 3d 1297 (9th Cir. 1997)(state-wide class action challenging on due process, equal protection and premption grounds the constitutionality of a voter-approved state Proposition denying health care, social services and education to suspected undocumented children and adults); and Orantes-Hernandez v. Smith, 541 F.Supp. 351 (C.D. Cal. 1982) (national class of Salvadoran nationals seeking political asylum in the United States).

Projects

Tents-4-Homeless

Tents-4-Homeless addresses the critical need to protect homeless people from inclement weather and to offer a temporary night-time place of refuge by providing tents and sleeping bags to homeless people.

This project does not address the root causes of homelessness - rapid economic globalization, increasing privatization and land speculation, lack of jobs and job training programs, lack of affordable housing, poverty and mental illness. Our efforts are aimed at addressing the pressing need of homeless people for a basic shelter to protect themselves from the rain or cold nights when emergency housing in a shelter program is not available. 

To learn more go, to the Tents-4-Homeless website. To volunteer with Tents-4-Homeless, go to our VOLUNTEER‚Äč page.

Casa Libre

Casa Libre is a historic 10,000-square-foot Gothic mansion built in 1901. Purchased by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, Inc. in 1996, it serves as a transitional shelter for unaccompanied immigrant minors released to the program from Federal custody.

Casa Libre's program expertise lies in the provision of shelter, social, educational, medical and legal services for homeless and detained unaccompanied minor immigrant children, who have often been abused, abandoned, or neglected in their home countries and traveled to the United States alone. Services are provided to youth without homes regardless of immigration status.

To learn more, go to the Casa Libre website. To volunteer at Casa Libre, go to our VOLUNTEER page.

Project Reunify

The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law represents all detained immigrant children in the United States through the Flores v. Sessions class action case.

Under the 1997 Flores settlement, The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law is the only non-governmental organization in the country permitted to inspect all detention sites where children are detained and to interview and assess the treatment of detained children.

At the Reunify.org website, volunteer lawyers, interpreters, and child welfare experts can register to assist CHRCL in its Flores monitoring of detention sites.

The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law represents all detained immigrant children in the United States through the Flores v. Sessions class action case.

Under the 1997 Flores settlement, The Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law is the only non-governmental organization in the country permitted to inspect all detention sites where children are detained and to interview and assess the treatment of detained children.

At the Reunify.org website, volunteer lawyers, interpreters, and child welfare experts can register to assist CHRCL in its Flores monitoring of detention sites.

To learn more or to sign up to volunteer to be a monitor for Project Reunify, go to the Project Reunify website.

Non-Profit Forms: 501c3, 990


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